The 5 best reads for autumn

The end of summer inevitably means a return to routine; the dreaded sound of the alarm clock, the morning rush, way too much work, bad weather (if you don’t live in the Canaries), and a long and rather sad etc.

One of the things that makes a rainy day easier to deal with is being able to snuggle up at home with a good book. We’ve looked around and chosen five that will definitely get people talking this autumn, so make sure you don’t miss out! Another fabulous plan for the autumn months is to book a suite in Baobab and spend some time in the island of eternal spring, where you could enjoy reading these wonderful books lying in the sunshine, next to a pool, with a mojito in your hand. That’s a slightly better plan, don’t you think?

The Loving Husband – Christobel Kent

How well do we ever really know our partners? This brilliant novel has you gripped from the start, and centres on the life of Fran Hall and her husband Nathan. The couple decide to leave London for a fresh start and move with their two children to a farmhouse in an idyllic location. But when Fran wakes one night to find Nathan gone, she makes a devastating discovery. As the questions about her husband and her relationships start to mount up, Fran’s normal, quiet life begins to spiral out of control. It’s a real page-turner as you discover what Fran is hiding from the police about her marriage. How well does she really know the man she called her husband?

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child – J.K. Rowling

The book everyone will be talking about this autumn will undoubtedly be the latest instalment of Harry Potter; it’s already the most pre-ordered book on Amazon. Currently a play in London’s West End, it’s divided into two parts. It’s also the prequel to the much-anticipated Harry Potter: Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. This time we get to meet a very different Harry Potter, who’s now a husband, father of three and an employee at the Ministry of Magic. Aside from being overworked, Harry also has to deal with the struggles of his youngest son, which sees the reader enter the complex world of father-son relationships.

Here I Am – Jonathan Safran Foer

Fasten your seatbelts for an emotional rollercoaster with Here I am. The novel centres around Julia and Jacob Bloch and their three sons, and is based in present-day Washington, D.C. Everyone’s lives are completely upturned when a devastating earthquake hits America, and, to make matters even worse, there’s also a very tense situation the Middle East, where conflict is reaching alarming levels. Yet as the crisis keeps getting worse, the family faces not only the things that divides them but also that which keeps them together. Fascinating, very cleverly written and sometimes laugh-out-loud funny, Safran Foer’s latest novel explores what it means to be human.

Small Great Things – Jodi Picoult

The woman who made us all cry with My Sister’s Keeper is back to break our hearts once again. Be warned, this is no light-hearted drama, but we’d expect nothing less from Jodi Picoult. Small Great Things is a story about an African American delivery nurse who has to deal with racism, infant mortality, and the infamous American justice system. It’s an exquisitely written, thought-provoking novel that will have you asking yourself some brutally honest questions about the role we all play in dealing with society’s wider issues.

After Disasters –  Viet Dinh

This brilliant debut novel explores the complicated and often dangerous world of aid workers in a novel that is utterly compelling. In the wake of a devastating earthquake in India, four people have to try and put their lives back together as they also bring international aid to the region. Through four men; Ted, Piotr, Andy and Dev, we discover the complicated lives they left behind and what can lead people into working in disaster relief. Haunting and at times heart-breaking, After Disasters can, at times, be uncomfortable to read, but it provides an incredible insight into human nature.

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